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Article
November 3, 1993

Users' Guides to the Medical LiteratureI. How to Get Started

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Drs Oxman, Sackett, and Guyatt), Family Medicine (Dr Oxman), and Medicine (Drs Sackett and Guyatt), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. A complete list of members of the Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group appears at the end of this article.
Departments of Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Department of Medicine, McMaster University; Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health Program, McMaster University; Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University; Division of Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, and the Departments of Health Administration and Medicine, University of Toronto (Ontario); Centre for Health Economics, University of York, United Kingdom; Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa (Ontario) and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University; Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas, Houston; Clinical Epidemiology Research Programme, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Ontario, Departments of Health Administration, Medicine, and Behavioral Sciences, University of Toronto (Ontario); Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Family Medicine, McMaster University;; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Department of Medicine, University of Rochester (NY) School of Medicine and Dentistry; Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Pediatrics, McMaster University; Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia; Clinical Epidemiology Unit and Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Ottawa (Ontario); Health Program, Office of Technology Assessment, US Congress, Washington, DC; Division of General Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

JAMA. 1993;270(17):2093-2095. doi:10.1001/jama.1993.03510170083036
Abstract

CLINICAL SCENARIO  You are a primary care physician inspired by a recent editorial in JAMA about lifelong learning.1 You decide to use some of the time you normally take for continuing medical education conferences for "practice-based education" tailored to your own practice. You begin by setting aside 2 hours every week to read about relevant clinical problems.It is now Friday morning and you have 2 hours to spend in the hospital library. You review a one-page list of questions you have generated from the patients you've seen in the prior week. Your questions include these: What should you tell a 33-year-old woman with migraine headaches who has asked for a prescription for sumatriptan after reading a magazine article about it? Should you be screening older men in your practice for prostate cancer? What should you tell the mother of a 6-month-old boy who had a febrile seizure about

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