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Article
October 9, 1996

The American Psychiatric Press Textbook of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry

Author Affiliations

University of Illinois at Chicago

 

edited by James R. Rundell and Michael G. Wise, 1171 pp, with illus, $112, ISBN0-88048-336-9, Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Press, 1996.

JAMA. 1996;276(14):1193-1194. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03540140081034
Abstract

"Photograph No. 107. Successful excision of the upper portion of the shaft of the right femur." From Orthopaedic Injuries of the Civil War: An Atlas of Orthopaedic Injuries and Treatments During the Civil War, by Julian E. Kuz and Bradley P. Bengtson, 76 pp, with illus, paper, $9.95, ISBN 0-9635861-7-3, Kennesaw, Ga, Kennesaw Mountain Press, Grand Rapids, Mich, Medical Staff Press (http://www.iserv.net/ ~civilmed), 1996. Reproduced by permission.

When I was a resident and junior faculty member working in consultation-liaison psychiatry, the literature on the field was scattered in journals and chapters of psychiatric and medical textbooks. Only a few, thin books were devoted to the field, such as the primer by Strain and Grossman.1 My limited experiences as a physician working with medically and psychiatrically ill patients had convinced me of the need for a biopsychosocial, integrated approach to patient care. At the time, medicine was undergoing considerable specialty

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