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Article
October 8, 1997

Management of Patients With HIV/AIDSWho Should Care?

Author Affiliations

From the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1997;278(14):1133-1134. doi:10.1001/jama.1997.03550140021011
Abstract

FIFTEEN YEARS after the first description of persons diagnosed as having the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS),1 and after almost 600 000 cases have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (as of the end of 1996),2 an issue under intense debate is that of who should provide medical care for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS.

See also p 1131.

It was 6 years after the initial report of AIDS cases before the first federal effort to educate health professionals with regard to this problem was formally initiated by establishing AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETCs).3 At that time, about 66 000 AIDS cases had been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (using different criteria for the diagnosis than at present).4

The 15 AETCs currently in operation are located throughout the United States. The budget for AETC operation

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