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From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
November 5, 1997

Self-Reported Use of Mammography Among Women Aged ≥40 Years—United States, 1989 and 1995

JAMA. 1997;278(17):1395-1396. doi:10.1001/jama.1997.03550170025010
Abstract

IN 1997, breast cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 180,200 women, and 43,900 women will die from the disease.1 Early detection combined with timely and appropriate treatment can alter the progress of and reduce mortality from this disease.2 Effective screening procedures are available to detect breast cancer in its early stages. However, the benefits of breast cancer screening to reduce mortality in the population can be achieved only if screening guidelines are followed and a large proportion of women receive screening examinations regularly. To estimate the state-specific proportions of women aged ≥40 years who reported receiving a mammogram during the preceding 2 years, CDC analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for 1989 and 1995. This report presents the findings, which indicate that, from 1989 to 1995, the percentage of women aged ≥40 years who reported receiving a mammogram during the preceding 2 years

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