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August 18, 1883

BLOOD-LETTING AS A REMEDY IN THE TREATMENT OF ECLAMPSIA PUERPERALIS AND “ACUTE PNEUMONIA.”

Author Affiliations

OIL CITY, PA.

JAMA. 1883;I(6):174-177. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390060014001d

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Abstract

On the 2d day of July, 35 years ago, I was called to attend Mrs. John Carson, of Armstrong county, Pa., in labor with her third child.

She was a large, muscular woman about six feet in height and built in proportion. A short time before my arrival, she was delivered of a still born child. The womb was contracted, the afterbirth expelled. There was no hæmorrhage, and she was comfortably “put to bed.” I say put to bed, as in those days women were nearly all delivered on the floor on their knees, and afterwards put to bed; apparently she was all right.

Whilst seated at the breakfast table enjoying my morning meal, after a seven mile ride, congratulating myself upon my “good luck,” and easy made fee, I was startled by a scream from the nurse, followed by doctor! doctor! On entering her room, I found my patientin

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