[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.204.108.121. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 6, 1883

To the Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association

JAMA. 1883;I(13):401. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390130021008

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Dear Doctor:  It always gives me pleasure to write to a man or body of men, who can appreciate an idea without a surgical operation.The matter about which I only wish to say a word has been broached many a time, and is now agitating the minds of the profession in various parts of our land, viz,:First—How much do we owe the alleged "manufacturing chemist?"Second—How much does he owe us?It furthermore has occurred to many of us, Dear Doctor, that the time when this clay can talk to the potter should pass. For a long series of years it has been the practice of the chemical clay (keeping up the simile) to tell the professional potter how it should be used. How it would act if it was not used as requested, and how the whole business would practically go to ruthless ruin unless the Esculapian

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×