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Article
December 8, 1883

DENUDATION, OR EROSION, OF THE TEETH.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1883;I(22):633-637. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390220001001

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Abstract

[Read to the Section on Oral Surgery of Association, June, 1883.]

Mr. President and Gentlemen:

The subject to which I desire to call your attention is one that is still under controversy, and my object in presenting this paper is to review the opinions that have generally been entertained as to the cause of the disease, and emphasize, if I can, more fully than has yet been done the objections to these views, and then recall to your minds an explanation of the cause of the disease which has not heretofore received the attention it has deserved, viz., electro-chemical action.

The terms denudation and erosion are derived from the Latin, the first meaning “to lay bare,” or “the condition of a part deprived of its natural covering, as a part denuded of its cuticle or mucous membrane, a bone of its periosteum, or a tooth of its enamel.” The

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