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Article
December 8, 1883

NEWS ITEMS.

JAMA. 1883;I(22):651-652. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390220019006

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Abstract

Medical Titles.  —Our provincial cousins "over the water" have shown a great deal of temerity lately in discussing the value, to the medical man, of the quality of the titles graciously bestowed by Her Majesty; and her Irish subjects have been indignant that they did not receive proper consideration in the distribution of such marks of honor. The latest comes from the Australian Medical Journal, which criticises the advertisement of a medical gentleman who styles himself "late assistant to the surgeon to the Queen." This is probably not a title conferred by official act, signed and sealed with due ceremony. Nevertheless, it has in part a familiar sound, and the Journal supposes that what is intended to be conveyed to the simple minds of the uninitiated general public is that the gentleman who thus describes himself was in the habit of running over to Windsor Castle, or up to Balmoral, when

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