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December 22, 1883

RECENT VIEWS RESPECTING THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LITHÆMIA.

JAMA. 1883;I(24):696-700. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390240008001b
Abstract

(Read before the Section for Clinical Medicine, Pathology, and Hygiene of the Suffolk District Medical Society, November, 14, 1883.

It is well known that a tendency has been manifest of late among medical men in this country, as for a long time past in England, to diagnosticate as suppressed pressed gout, or lithæmia, cases presenting a great variety of nervous symptoms, often anomalous and distressing in character, generally occurring in patients of gouty, but sometimes even in those of nongouty gouty descent.

This tendency has been met in many quarters with incredulity, and some men of conservative temperament would be well content to let the matter slip by with a verdict of non-proven. Where no overt gout exists it is gratuitous to assume suppressed gout, they say, and the argument seems applicable to this country try and generation, in which overt gout is so rare. Such an attitude seems to

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