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Article
January 12, 1884

A VERY LARGE SALIVARY CALCULUS REMOVED FROM A PATIENT.

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE, MD

JAMA. 1884;II(2):38-39. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390270010001a

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Abstract

Salivary calculi are not of very rare occurrence. A tumor under the tongue, on one side of the frenum, a dilated duct from the sub-maxillary gland full of fluid, and called ranula, might contain calcareous deposits. But very rarely have we the opportunity of reporting a calculus of such magnitude as the one which I extracted from the mouth of a patient two months since. I herewith append a report of the case:

Mr. W., aged 73, consulted me for a glaucomatous trouble. During the consultation, he desired to know whether his defect of vision could be aggravated by a disease of long standing in the mouth. In inspecting this cavity, I found a large swelling under the tongue, on the right side of the frenum. It was a very prominent elevation on the floor of the buccal cavity, extending from the inner face of the chin toward ward the

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