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Article
January 10, 1885

A CASE OF SYMPATHETIC NEURO-RETINITIS WITH CONSECUTIVE SEROUS IRITIS.

Author Affiliations

ASSISTANT OPTHALMIC SURGEON HOSPITAL UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

JAMA. 1885;IV(2):43-44. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02390770015001c
Abstract

Read before the Ophthalmic Section of the American Medical Association.

The so-called sympathetic diseases of the eye still hold a first place in the interest of ophthalmic surgeons, not only because of their intrinsic importance, but also because of the doubt which still hangs over their pathogeny. It is not my present purpose to attempt a full discussion of the important questions involved in the study of these affections of the hitherto sound eye, clinically related to pathological processes in the injured eye; but to relate briefly the history of a case which seems to call in question the correctness of the opinion which regards the consecutive affection as always of sympathetic origin.

Injury to Ciliary Region. Neuro-Retinitis in Uninjured injured Eye; Consecutive Serous Iritis.—John D., æt. 14. Dec. 26, 1882, was struck in the left eye by the arrow from a boy's gun. The propelling force was a rubber

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