[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.107.222. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 14, 1885

Medical Legislation.

JAMA. 1885;IV(7):182-184. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02390820014004

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

—This being the season of the year when the legislatures of the several States are generally in session, we notice before many of these legislative bodies bills or forms of laws designed for regulating the practice of medicine and surgery. A large proportion of these bills have been prepared and recommended by some medical society or professional organization. We have been interested in examining the details of such of these proposed laws as have come directly under our observation, and we regret to state that most of them bear evidence of having been framed with far more reference to the avoidance of popular prejudices, or the reconciling of medical factions and supposed conflicting interests, than to any sound principles of legislation or of political economy.

For instance, in the bill before the legislature of the State of Texas, we find the following provisions:

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×