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Article
August 16, 1884

THE TREATMENT OF HYDROPHOBIA, HISTORICALLY AND PRACTICALLY CONSIDERED.

Author Affiliations

OF PHILADELPHIA. Fellow of the College of Physicians, and of the Academy of Surgery of Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1884;III(7):169-180. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390560001001
Abstract

The history of medicine can be traced back, more or less obscurely, to a period about 1200 years before the Christian era to whatever real or fabled healer may have been the foundation of the myth of Aesculapius, yet Aristotle, who lived from 38410 322 B. C, is the first writer, whose works are extant, by whom we have distinct mention of the subject of hydrophobia. His reference to it has given rise to much discussion, because it does not accord with what is commonly believed about it, but there can be no doubt that he spoke of what is now known by this name. His expression is: "Dogs are subject to three diseases. These are called lyssa, cynanche and podagra. Of these lyssa causes mania, andwhatever is bitten (δταυ ϛσκη) all those bitten go mad except man. (λυττώσιν άπαντα τα δηχθέατα πληα άαϑςωπον). This disease seizes on dogs and

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