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Article
September 27, 1884

SOLAR SYSTEM.

JAMA. 1884;III(13):362-363. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390620026012

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Abstract

Matter, besides possessing its qualities and properties, exists in the solid, liquid, gaseous and fourth or single atom states. The sun emits a compound ray of carbon and hydrogen in this state not in direct rays but in the form of a slightly-spiral shaped figure eight, whose outward and downward rays pass between the orbits of Saturn and Uranus onwards and upwards, lapping over and around the planets of Neptune and Uranus, causing the retrograde motion of both planets and satellites when they again dip downwards and homewards toward the sun, thus forming one vast globe of light and heat, the matter of which is not cast into space, but returns, carrying with it the cosmic matter of other worlds as food for the strata of chlorine gas enveloping the sun, by which it is burned, causing light. The hydrogen is the reflecting ray and reflects the sun's light in

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