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Article
October 25, 1884

EPISTAXIS.

Author Affiliations

ALLEGHENY CITY, PA., ASSOCIATE PHYSICIAN TO (NOSE, THROAT AND CHEST DEPARTMENT) PITTSBURGH DISPENSARY.

JAMA. 1884;III(17):453-455. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390660005001b

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Abstract

Read in Section of Ophthalmology, Otology and Laryngology of the American Medical Association, May, 1884.

It is the duty of the specialist to provide remedies for the various diseases to which the organs in his specialty are liable, and be prepared for their accidental emergencies.

Of all the hæmorrhages which the rhinoscopist and laryngologist are called upon to relieve, epistaxis or nose-bleed is by far the most common. I propose in this paper to limit myself to its consideration.

We learn from Galen that the word hæmorrhage was limited by Hippocrates to flux of blood from the nostrils, and he has been followed in this restrained use of the term by Sauvages, and most of the nosologists of that time. It was Vogel who first pointed out the inconvenience of this limitation, and exchanged hæmorrhagia for epistaxis, thus liberating the former term to express flux of blood generally.

When we

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