May 9, 1885


JAMA. 1885;IV(19):521-522. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02390940017007

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In the December number of the Bristol Medico-Chirurgical Journal, Mr. J. Greig Smith reports two cases of hæmophilia, with remarks on the treatment of the affection. In the first case, the blood which came from the wound was of the ordinary watery nature, as observed after considerable hæmorrhage; the hæmoglobin was only six-tenths of the normal, and the corpuscles 1,600,000 instead of 5,000,000. One curious feature in this case was the fact that every large joint in the body has been affected at one time or another. Any little rough treatment would cause the joints to become distended, probably with blood. The joints usually fill in a few hours, cause much pain, and subside in a few days.

As regards the treatment of this affection, Mr. Smith has little to offer that is new, but his remarks are worthy of careful consideration. He does not believe in medicine; the patient should

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