[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 13, 1886

OPERATION FOR CONGENITAL CATARACT IN TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR; VISION SLOWLY ESTABLISHED.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF EYE AND EAR DISEASES IN THE UNIYERSITY OF MARYLAND, AND SURGEON-IN-CHIEF OF THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR AND EYE CHARITY HOSPITAL, OF BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1886;VI(7):175-176. doi:10.1001/jama.1886.04250020035003

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

That children are born blind with cataract is a matter of every day observation. That these cataracts can be removed by absorption under surgical procedures is the experience of every ophthalmic surgeon, and that infants who have been operated upon for cataract can, when old enough, learn to read with proper glasses, has long since been established by thousands of witnesses. The acquisition of sight to those born blind is now, therefore, no novelty. Experience has also taught the surgeon that if good sight is to be secured to those born blind with cataract, the operation for the removal of the obstruction must be done very early in life. If the cloud in the pupil be allowed to remain for too long a lime, during the growth of the child, the retina seems to be arrested in its development by the absence of its normal stimulus, strong light, and the needful

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×