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Article
February 27, 1886

BRAIN TUMORS.

Author Affiliations

LECTURER ON NERVOUS DISEASES IN THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF OHIO, CINCINNATI.

JAMA. 1886;VI(9):231-232. doi:10.1001/jama.1886.04250020091002
Abstract

Our present knowledge of cerebral localization lends additional interest to the study of all cerebral lesions. This statement is least applicable to neoplasms. They have less value than other kinds of lesions in forwarding our knowledge of localization. This is the more to be regretted, as it seems probable that brain tumors will soon be relegated, in part at least, to the domain of surgery.

Large and even multiple tumors may be almost latent, while small growths may produce marked symptoms. In one instance, a tumor may produce symptoms, and in another not, when in precisely the same part, and the symptoms may be altogether deceptive. The factors which determine the symptoms produced by a tumor are:

Its location.

Its size.

Its character, density, vascularity, etc.

The rapidity and manner of its growth.

The extent of destruction or softening of nervous substance.

These bear a certain relation to the kind

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