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Article
October 16, 1886

A LARGE PHARYNGO-LARYNGEAL FIBROMA—CURED.1

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF LARYNGOLOGY, RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, AND PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THROAT AND CHEST, WOMAN'S MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1886;VII(16):429-430. doi:10.1001/jama.1886.04250100065004
Abstract

E. G., farmer, aged 47, was sent to me January 7, 1886, by Dr. Chas. Enfield, of Scranton, Iowa. He was supposed to be suffering from a fibrous tumor of the larynx.

The patient stated that about two years previously he had begun to experience some difficulty in swallowing, which had been gradually increasing until deglutition had become almost impossible, in consequence of which he had emaciated, having lost about fifty pounds, and had become very weak. Recently there had been much difficulty in sleeping on account of choking spells. A few months before 1 saw him a physician, whose name I did not learn, had removed a portion of the tumor, which, upon microscopie examination, he had pronounced fibrous in character. The patient had experienced considerable relief after, the operation, but the tumor had continued to grow and for some months another physician had made ineffectual attempts to reduce

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