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February 8, 1908

SENSORY DISSOCIATION AS A SYMPTOM.WITH REPORT OF A CASE OF SYRINGOMYELIA.

JAMA. 1908;L(6):434-439. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310320022001f
Abstract

The following case of syringomyelia I saw in consultation with Dr. John L. Porter, to whom I am indebted for the privilege of reporting it. The case is presented not on account of anything unusual about it, but as a text merely for the discussion of sensory dissociation.

History.  —A. S., aged 30, an unmarried German woman. Her family history was negative, no hereditary neuropathic taint being anywhere discoverable. Her father, mother, sister and brother were vigorous, hard-working people, simple in their tastes and plain in their mode of living. A brother died of typhoid fever, complicated by pneumonia, having been perfectly healthy up to that time.Until she was 8 years of age the patient was a strong and robust child. Photographs, which I have seen, taken prior to this age, would seem to confirm this. At 8 years of age, however, she was stricken with some severe form

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