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Article
February 29, 1908

THE CHOICE OF A VASODILATOR AND THE INDICATIONS FOR VASODILATATION.

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS.

JAMA. 1908;L(9):676-679. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310350022001e
Abstract

In several recent articles I have asked for greater attention to the use of sodium nitrite as a vasodilator in preference to nitroglycerin and amyl nitrite. The administration of the sodium salt during the past four years in numerous cases where arterial relaxation seemed indicated, and under the control of blood pressure determinations, has graphically demonstrated the efficiency and permanency with which proper doses of sodium nitrite will lower arterial tension. Comparative observations with amyl nitrite and nitroglycerin have invariably proved favorable to the sodium compound. I have made only a limited number of observations with erythrol tetranitrate, introduced by Prof. Bradbury of England, and could demonstrate no advantage over the sodium salt. It is very expensive, a dozen tablets costing one dollar.

Accurate methods of observing changes in pulse tension applicable to clinical usage have done much toward introducing and establishing in medical practice many facts concerning the action

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