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Article
February 29, 1908

Winter Cholera.

JAMA. 1908;L(9):707. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.02530350053015

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Abstract

Escanaba, Mich., Feb. 18, 1908.

To the Editor:  —Your editorial on "Winter Cholera" in The Journal, February 15, leads me to say just a few words on that form of bowel trouble. Many cities will undoubtedly proclaim priority to Lansing, and it may be well to state that many widespread epidemics have been recorded in southern Michigan as far back as 1880. These were given consideration and discussed by the health authorities in Michigan in 1881. The Indiana State Board of Health also called attention, in their report of 1901-1902, to an epidemic on winter cholera at Michigan City. The report reads, in part, as follows: "December 27 information was received by telephone from Michigan City that a severe epidemic of winter cholera existed at that place. My informant, Dr. Tilotson, said he believed the outbreak was due to sewage that had been introduced in the water supply. He explained

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