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Article
April 25, 1908

THE OPERATION FOR THROMBUS OF THE SIGMOID SINUS AND INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN, OF OTITIC ORIGIN.

JAMA. 1908;L(17):1331-1338. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310430015001c
Abstract

One of the most important sequelæ of middle-ear infections is phlebitis or thrombosis of some of the venous drains of the head, and particularly when such pathologic conditions occur, as they usually do, in the sigmoid bend of the lateral sinus. Disease of this nature is found not only in the sigmoid sinus, but also in the lateral sinus proper, the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses, the cavernous sinus, the jugular bulb, the internal jugular vein and its connections, etc. The sigmoid sinus is, however, its favorite location on account of its vascular connections with the tympanic cavity and adjoining cells and its close contiguity to these frequently infected structures. As the jugular bulb is located directly beneath the tympanic cavity, an unusually high dome to the bulb, or necrosis of the tympanic floor, or congenital dehiscences in the floor, will assist in the conveyance of infection. This will occur

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