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May 29, 1909

PRIMARY CARCINOMA OF THE LIVERWITH REPORT OF A PATIENT WHO REMAINED WELL OVER TWO YEARS AFTER OPERATION

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon to the New York Polyclinic Hospital New York

JAMA. 1909;LII(22):1741-1743. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420480011002
Abstract

Primary carcinoma of the liver is a rare affection. The literature on the subject consists mainly of reports of individual cases and consequent limited experience.

White1 states that in 11,500 autopsies at Guy's Hospital during the years 1870-93, there were 11 (i. e., about 1 in 1,000) cases of primary carcinoma of the liver, and that but 7 such cases were reported in the Transactions of the Pathological Society of London during twenty sessions.

According to Eggel2 of Munich, who has studied the subject exhaustively from the standpoint of pathology, primary carcinoma of the liver occurs about once in each 2,000 cases of all fatal ailments coming to autopsy. He tabulates 163 primary cases, of which 117 are described microscopically, 100 being of liver-cell origin and 17 of the bile-duct variety. The others showed metastases or infiltration, malignant in character. Ewing3 affirms this classification and states that

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