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Article
July 17, 1909

MOTOR APHASIA AS A SEQUELA TO SCARLET FEVERREPORT OF A CASE

JAMA. 1909;LIII(3):208. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550030050003a

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Abstract

A child, aged 6, well nourished, had a chronic discharge from the ears, and an attack of measles three months previous to present illness. The scarlet fever started with nausea, headache, vomiting and high fever (105 F.). Cerebral symptoms, as restlessness, delirium and mental apathy, were predominant. The patient could be aroused for medicine and nourishment, but soon sank again into a mental stupor. On the fifth day of the disease his ears began to discharge, the temperature remaining high with remissions, till the seventh day, when improvement began and amelioration of all the symptoms. By the middle of the second week paraplegia of the left side was noticed with motor aphasia. The patient seemed to understand words, and retained full power of hearing, but the power of articulate speech and of producing complicated movements in the region of speech muscles was wanting. The tongue could not be protruded well

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