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August 14, 1909

HELP THE MOTHER NURSE HER CHILDA PLEA TO PHYSICIANS NOT TO BEGIN ARTIFICIAL FEEDING WITHOUT FIRST TRYING TO HELP THE MOTHER MAINTAIN HER MILK SUPPLY

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Diseases of Children, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1909;LIII(7):520-523. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550070016002c
Abstract

That no artificial food can take the place of breast-milk has always been admitted, even by those who have had the most success with artificial feeding, men like Holt1 and Rotch.2 In some parts of this country, however, it is uncommon to see any attempt made to induce a mother to nurse her child, even when her breast-milk has not been examined to see whether it was abnormal or not. Is this not chiefly our fault—that is, the fault of the physicians?

Not only are no efforts made three to four days after birth, but later, when the child is between three and six months old, breast-feeding is often stopped for no apparent cause, here again without examination of the milk to find out its composition. Would it not be more just to the infant

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