[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.129.152. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 16, 1909

CEREBROSPINAL SYPHILIS CAUSING INTERNAL HYDROCEPHALUS AND SYMPTOMS OF CEREBELLAR TUMORREPORT OF A CASE WITH NECROPSY FINDINGS

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Neurology, Medico-Chirurgical College; Assistant Neurologist to the Philadelphia General and the Medico-Chirurgical Hospitals PHILADELPHIA

From the Philadelphia Hospital and the Laboratory of Neuropathology of the Medico-Chirurgical College. Read before the Philadelphia Neurological Society, April 23, 1909.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(16):1286-1287. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550160042002

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The following case, studied in Dr. T. H. Weisenburg's wards of the Philadelphia General Hospital, is of considerable interest for several reasons. Although cerebral syphilis frequently causes symptoms of brain tumor, it generally does so by the formation of gummata in relation with the meninges or vessels, and not, as in this case, by occlusion of the foramen of Magendie and resulting chronic internal hydrocephalus. The comparatively frequent occurrence of congenital internal hydrocephalus in association with congenital syphilis has often been noted. The pathology of congenital hydrocephalus is not well established, but occlusion of the foramina of communication between the ventricular system and the subdural space of the brain has been found postmortem by various observers, and appears to be the cause of the condition in at least some of the cases.

Acquired, or secondary, hydrocephalus has been found in numerous cases to be due to mechanical obstruction of the foramen of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×