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December 11, 1909

BETTER ANESTHESIA IN MEDIUM-SIZED HOSPITALSSOME YEARS OF BROOKLYN EXPERIENCE

Author Affiliations

Gynecologist to Brooklyn Hospital, Obstetrician-in-Chief to Methodist-Episcopal Hospital, Consultant Gynecologist to St. Mary's Hospital, Jamaica. BROOKLYN

JAMA. 1909;LIII(24):2004-2005. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550240048002c
Abstract

Anesthetically, the hospital field in general, like all Gaul, is divided into three parts.

First come the great institutions which we of the hundred-bed class and two-hundred-bed class regard from afar, ascribing to them unlimited incomes. For them a salaried staff of expert anesthetists is possible, and from them it should be required. Indeed, the public would demand it if the public had any idea of how preposterously ill-balanced the operating-table often is with a resourceful and fearless expert at one end and a scared and clumsy novice at the other.

Next is the small group of private hospitals, which can hardly do better than follow the plan of Baldy and the Mayos, who train an intelligent woman to do that one thing well. Such salaried service is reliable and unvarying. The work is dignified and permanent. Under such conditions it would no longer be considered a makeshift position as

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