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Article
December 25, 1909

TRUE TIC DOULOUREUX OF THE SENSORY FILAMENTS OF THE FACIAL NERVEI. CLINICAL REPORT OF A CASE IN WHICH CURE WAS EFFECTED BY PHYSIOLOGIC EXTIRPATION OF THE GENICULATE GANGLION II. REPORT OF SURGICAL TREATMENT

JAMA. 1909;LIII(26):2144-2146. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550260001001a
Abstract

I. CLINICAL REPORT AND REMARKS BY DR. CLARK  It has been fairly well proved by recent investigation that the facial nerve, like the trifacial, is a mixed nerve. Its sensory ganglion is the geniculate. The motor root of the geniculate is the facialis proper, and its sensory root is the nerve of Wrisberg. Below the ganglion the peripheral divisions are the facialis proper, the greater and lesser superficial petrosal, external petrosal and chorda tympani. This ganglion is of the spinal type, consequently liable to inflammations, as herpes zoster, and degenerations, as in tic douloureux. The zoster zone of the geniculate lies just in the interior of the auricle and external canal. This zone is interposed between the zone for the Gasserian in front and the cervical behind. In cither zoster or neuralgias we may have one or all three zones affected at once. There is also a considerable degree

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