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February 12, 1910

SCOPOLAMIN AND MORPHIN IN NARCOSIS AND IN CHILDBIRTHA REPORT TO THE COUNCIL ON PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College; Member of Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry NEW YORK CITY

JAMA. 1910;LIV(7):516-519. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550330001001e
Abstract

OBSTETRICAL USES  The discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of scopolamin and morphin in surgical practice indicates some of its uses and limitations in obstetrics, but the conditions are different in many essentials, and those relating to childbirth will be discussed independently. The physiologic actions of scopolamin and of morphin must be borne in mind here not less than in the surgical use of these agents, and there are certain points on which stress must be placed, with reference to this application of the two drugs, hence the pharmacology will be again considered briefly.

PHARMACOLOGY  Scopolamin passes across the placental circulation and appears in the first urine of the new-born child, and it is excreted into the colostrum for a variable period after its administration to the parturient woman, according to the experiments of Holzbach. Kehrer found that scopolamin caused excitation of the perfused uterus, but it is improbable that

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