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Article
February 19, 1910

THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF AMEBIC ULCERATION OF THE LARGE INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

JAMA. 1910;LIV(8):598-600. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550340001001e
Abstract

I have chosen the designation "amebic ulceration of the large intestine" instead of the customary "amebic dysentery" in order to emphasize several points which seem to me of vital importance to a profitable study of the subject:

1. The essential feature of the disease process is always ulceration. Inflammation of the mucosa, more or less general, loose stools, mucous and bloody discharges, etc., are usually present, but they are properly to be regarded as incidental or secondary and in no sense distinctive.

2. The characteristic lesions of the disease are always found in the large bowel. The consensus of opinion is that the primary site of invasion is the cecum, whence the infection is carried by natural forces throughout the colon and rectum. Involvement of the distal portion of the ileum is occasionally mentioned in autopsy reports, but clinically this possibility may be, and usually is, ignored.

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