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Article
March 5, 1910

THE VALUE OF BLOOD-CULTURES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Pathology, Denver and Gross College of Medicine; Pathologist to the City and County Hospital DENVER

JAMA. 1910;LIV(10):756-759. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550360001001a
Abstract

The aspect of typhoid fever which has aroused most interest within the past few years is the presence of the bacillus in the blood. Although it had not infrequently been recovered, the impression was general, until five or six years ago, that the typhoid bacillus rarely invaded the circulating blood. In an exhaustive review of the bacteriology of the blood in 1903, Rosenberger1 showed that this view must be modified. He collected the records of all the examinations to date, numbering 518, in which the bacillus was recovered 419 times. Although it was thus proved that invasion of the blood-stream ia frequent, the belief remained that in typhoid, as in diphtheria, bacteriemia is a mere incident of the infection and by no means requisite to the production of the clinical picture.

In 1907 Coleman and Buxton2 published an analysis of 1,602 examinations, including 123 of their own, of

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