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April 16, 1910

THE ADMISSION RATE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AMONG MERCHANT SEAMEN DURING THE PAST TWENTY YEARS

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, U. S. Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service, Assigned to U. S. Marine Hospital CHICAGO

JAMA. 1910;LIV(16):1284-1286. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550420001001b

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Abstract

The figures presented herewith will, I think, be a surprise to many people, even to some of the medical officers of the Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service who have been active in bringing about the result which the figures indicate. A few words of explanation are necessary before the figures themselves are presented.

In 1893 Passed Assistant Surgeon J. O. Cobb of the service contributed to the annual report of Surgeon-General Wyman a strong plea for the establishment of special hospitals for the care of tuberculous seamen. The following year Passed Assistant Surgeon Bratton submitted, a very strong plea for the same action. Surgeon-General Wyman took up the plan at once and quickly secured the use of the abandoned military reservation at Fort Stanton, New Mexico. The original plan of Dr. Cobb was to have two sanatoriums, one on the Atlantic, in North Carolina

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