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Article
April 23, 1910

AN ANOMALY IN SENSIBILITY DURING AN ACUTE SEROUS MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1910;LIV(17):1370-1371. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550430001001j

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Abstract

History.  —The patient, a farmer, aged 61, was thrown from a trap when intoxicated, and during the next ten days gradually became delirious and quadriplegic, with rectal and vesical incontinence. He had been a hard drinker, and for two years had suffered from numb feelings and coldness of hands and feet without pain or loss of power.

Examination.  —Ten days after the accident, when the patient was admitted to the Emergency Hospital, there was complete paralysis below the second thoracic segment and also of the right triceps innervation. Other arm movements were conserved although much impaired, especially distally. Facial and neck movements were strong. All reflexes were then absent with the exception of a slight dorsiflexion of the left great toe. In his delirious state the sensibility could be examined only incompletely, but it was clear that the right side was quite insensitive to pain and temperature as high as the second

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