[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 3, 1912

A STUDY OF THE CUBIC CAPACITY AND SUPERFICIAL AREA OF THE MAXILLARY SINUS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Departments of Anatomy and of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases in St. Louis University.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(5):359-361. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080041013
Abstract

The maxillary sinus (antrum of Highmore), on account of the close relationship which it bears to rhinology and stomatology, perhaps has been more closely studied than any other of the accessory sinuses of the nose. It has been known for a long time that this sinus is pyramidal in shape; that the base is directed toward the nasal fossa and the apex is directed toward the malar bone; that the apices of the roots of the upper second bicuspid and first and second molar teeth often lie very close to the floor and sometimes perforate it; that the sinuses vary in shape and size in different persons and even on different sides of the same person.

Clinical observation has shown that the maxillary sinus is subject to diseases which have their origin, not only in the nasal cavity, but also in some of the other accessory sinuses and in the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×