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Article
August 3, 1912

INFECTED AREAS AROUND THE ENDS OF ROOTS OF TEETH

Author Affiliations

Lecturer on Dental Pathology, Department of Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LIX(5):361-363. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080043014
Abstract

The spongy character of the alveoli in which the ends of the roots of the teeth are embedded leaves them especially vulnerable to purulent invasion. This portion of the alveolus is frequently referred to as the apical space, because so often the osseous structure around the apices of the roots is lost to a greater or less extent on account of an abscess forming in this region. The majority of these infections are alveolar abscesses arising from the death of the pulps of the teeth. There are also pericemental abscesses, existing coincident with living pulps which have not been infected. This latter class may he variously subdivided.

The course of the ordinary alveolar abscess is generally marked by a crisis, at which time the pus escapes into the mouth, either through the plate of the alveolus, or between the periosteum and the root at the gingival border. Unless a radical

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