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August 3, 1912

FIVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE WITH THE HIGH-CALORY DIET IN TYPHOID

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Applied Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College; Visiting Physician to Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LIX(5):363-367. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080045015
Abstract

Three years ago I called attention to a new principle in the dietetic treatment of typhoid, namely, the principle of supplying the patient with sufficient food to diminish materially, and in some cases to prevent, loss of nitrogen and weight.

The amount of food recommended exceeded that furnished by any diet hitherto employed in the treatment of the disease by 1,500 to 2,000 and more calories a day. Though the number of cases in which the diet had been used was not large, something less than fifty, the results had been so striking that it seemed desirable to advocate the principle publicly.

In the discussion which followed the reading of the paper, criticisms were made of the diet which, had they been justified, would have rendered culpable any further attempt to employ it.

In the three years which have elapsed since the paper was presented, the study of the effects

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