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Article
August 10, 1912

SARCOMA OF THE CEREBELLUM IN A BOY

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE, WASH.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(6):443. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080125019

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Abstract

History.  —The patient, a boy, aged 11, came under our observation in June, 1911, with the following history: Father and mother were both living and well. One child died four years ago from "ear trouble" following measles. Two oilier children were well. The patient had had scarlet fever at four years and measles at five years; he had not had diphtheria. He was always well except for occasional attacks of severe headache and nausea occurring suddenly and without prodromal symptoms since the attack of scarlet fever, which had become much more frequent during the last few months. Five weeks ago he left school and was up and about until three weeks ago with almost constant headache on exertion and frequent vomiting. Absolute quiet greatly diminished both these symptoms.

Examination.  —Temperature was 07.4, pulse 80, respiration not accelerated. The patient was well-developed and rather poorly nourished. He lay mostly on the

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