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October 5, 1912

THE TEACHING OF SYPHILISTHE ATTITUDE OF HOSPITAL BOARDS TO THIS DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, Western Reserve University CLEVELAND

JAMA. 1912;LIX(14):1248-1251. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100018006
Abstract

In the evolution of the American medical college it has been necessary from time to time to call attention to the object for which the medical school exists. Primarily, in training men to supply the need of a rugged and rapidly increasing population, medical colleges sprang up until their number became excessive, and the quality of instruction furnished failed to keep pace with the demand. At that time, as in the beginning, those who desired to pursue advanced study were compelled to seek such training in the medical centers of Europe. With but few exceptions such was the condition previous to the beginning of the present decade.

The first change in the primitive régime was in the development of the laboratory. This involved an expenditure of money that wrought a double benefit, for it not only improved the curriculum but rendered medical schools unprofitable and consequently impossible as a private

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