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Article
October 19, 1912

THE RELATION OF INTERSTATE WATERS TO THE SPREAD OF TYPHOID

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, Public Health Service WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(16):1425-1429. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100193004
Abstract

Interstate waters are the source of water-supply for many millions of people. The number actually dependent on interstate or international sources is constantly growing, Sanitary conditions in the drainage area of the Great Lakes and the drainage basins of the Missouri, the Mississippi, the Ohio and other great rivers are becoming more important because of the increasing demands on these waters as sources of public supply. With the increase of population especially in sewered cities there is a coincident increase in direct sewage pollution of these waters. It has been the common practice in American cities to use these interstate waters for sewage disposal. This method of sewage disposal by dilution has an enormous advantage because of low cost over other methods involving more or less purification. In so far as nuisance is concerned, there was usually stream flow or volume of water sufficient to ensure proper dilution. No criticism

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