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Article
October 26, 1912

APHASIA AND AGRAPHIA IN SOME PRACTICAL SURGICAL RELATIONS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology in the University of Pennsylvania; Professor of Surgery in the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LIX(17):1513-1518. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100281006
Abstract

Most Important Diagnostic Phenomena.—Motor aphasia and motor agraphia, usually partial, anomia or paranomia, inability to copy or write from dictation when both convolutions are involved; ability to write from copy or dictation preserved when the third frontal convolution alone is involved.

Symptom Sometimes Present.  —Partial word-deafness. Symptoms from Invasion of Neighboring Parts.—Jacksonian epilepsy, usually facial or faciobrachial, inability perfectly to maintain attention, hemiparesis.The stimulus to present this subject of aphasia in some of its relations to surgical procedure was given by a recent case in which operation was successfully performed and in which the clinical phenomena distinctly indicated implication of the cortex of the hinder portion of the third and second frontal convolutions. Similar cases have been reported by McConnell,1 Mills,2 Frazier,3 and others, but additional reports are desirable especially in the light of the differences of opinion which have arisen since the pronouncement of Marie

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