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Article
November 9, 1912

THE RELATIONS OF THE CIVIL HOSPITAL TO THE MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT IN TIME OF PEACE; IN TIME OF WAR

Author Affiliations

Colonel, Medical Corps, U. S. Army WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(19):1698-1701. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110112014
Abstract

The policy of the people of the United States has always been opposed to the maintenance of a large standing army. Our isolated position at a comparatively great over-sea distance from other world powers, our aloofness from international politics prior to the war with Spain, and the faith of the people in our patriotism and national courage as military assets have contributed to the continuance of this policy. Our military establishment has consequently not expanded in the same ratio as our population, or kept pace with the evolution of our institutions.

The civil hospital is now no longer an establishment merely for the care of the sick and injured, but has become in addition a teaching institution with a staff of men eminent in their respective domains, who are actuated by the spirit of progress, and whose work and coordinated experiences are directed toward the betterment and happiness of the

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