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Article
November 16, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LIX(20):1798-1802. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110212015
Abstract

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1912

INSECTS AS CARRIERS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES  Scarcely second in causative importance to bacteria, the primary agents in infectious diseases, are parasites and other insects, the active and often indispensable mediums in the spread of such diseases. This phase of epidemiology has not been exhaustively studied, and it is possible that scarcely more than a beginning has been made in determining what insects may act as carriers. Mention need hardly be made of the two species of mosquito, the house-fly, the flea, the tick, etc., as well-known carriers. M. F. Gales1 states that on shipboard roaches, to which hitherto little attention has been paid as carriers of disease, are responsible for the continuance and spread of typhoid, diphtheria, tonsillitis and tuberculosis.

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