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Article
November 23, 1912

SPINAL ANESTHESIA

Author Affiliations

Consulting Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital; Anesthetist, Children's Hospital, Boston BOSTON

JAMA. 1912;LIX(21):1841-1843. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110255002
Abstract

In previous writings on this subject,1 I reported 242 of my own cases, done at the Massachusetts General Hospital and in private practice, with a minimum of untoward effects during and after anesthesia, but with fifteen partial or complete failures to produce anesthesia, and with one case which showed very alarming symptoms during and after operation with eventual perfect recovery. I have now to report of my own cases, only an additional thirty-three. These, combined with twentynine cases (two failures) done by Dr. G. W. Morse, and sixteen cases (two failures) done by Dr. G. D. Cutler, the resident surgeons of the Massachusetts General Hospital, make a total of three hundred and twenty cases with nineteen failures.

Since my last report I have had no failures, have been able to perform spinal puncture almost without pain, and have had no untoward effects during operation, and a minimum of untoward

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