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Article
November 23, 1912

THE ABILITY OF MOTHERS TO NURSE THEIR CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pediatrics in the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LIX(21):1874-1877. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110288013
Abstract

Perhaps this topic may well be opened by emphasizing the necessity for women to nurse their children, particularly as so much misconception exists regarding this, not only on the part of the laity, but of physicians themselves. I have heard expert physicians say that they have little fear of difficulty in feeding an infant artificially if only they can have the charge of it from the beginning. I thoroughly agree with the necessity of the early control by the pediatrist in order to avoid the digestive disturbances which so readily arise. The difficulty is thereby lessened, but by no means removed. I cannot share the optimistic view expressed. There may exist the man who can, underthese circumstances, feed infants as successfully artificially as at the breast, but I have yet to meet him. Certainly, all statistics indicate the contrary. A few of these may be of interest.

INFANT MORTALITY AND 

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