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Article
November 23, 1912

SUPPLEMENTAL BREAST-FEEDING IN INFANTS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(21):1877-1881. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110291014
Abstract

Vital statistics have abundantly demonstrated the following facts:

1. Mortality is greater during the first year than at any other time of life, and higher during the first three months of life than during any other period.

2. Mortality and morbidity are higher among bottlefed than among breast-fed infants. This is the testimony of writers on diseases in children. As there is no evidence that breast-fed infants receive better care than those reared on the bottle, it is evident that the only reason for the greater mortality in bottle-fed infants is due to the nature of the food. The reasons for the difference in mortality may be briefly summarized as follows:

A. The milk of the mother is adapted by nature to the peculiar needs of the human infant, just as the milk of other mammals is peculiarly adapted to their offspring.

B. It contains all of the elements necessary

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