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Article
November 23, 1912

PENETRATING ABDOMINAL WALL WOUND BY REVOLVER BULLET, COMPLICATED BY TWENTY-TWO INTESTINAL PERFORATIONS; OPERATION AND RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

Chicago Professor of Gynecology, Chicago Policlinic; Assistant Professor of Gynecology, Rush Medical College; Surgeon to Cook County Hospital

JAMA. 1912;LIX(21):1886-1887. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270110300020

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Abstract

History.  —C. P., an Austrian, aged 35, a machinist, was admitted to my surgical service in Cook County Hospital, April 27, 1908, with a history of having been shot about a half-hour previously. The bullet had been fired by a man somewhat taller than himself who was standing to the left and somewhat behind him. The external wound apparently had not bled; neither had there been any coughing, vomiting or passage of blood from the rectum or bladder. Comparatively little pain was complained of in the abdomen itself but there was intense pain in the perineum and in the left side of the scrotum.

Examination.  —The abdomen was slightly distended and the recti and oblique muscles were rigid, especially on the left side. The absolute liver dulness was lost. A small oval dimesized wound was found in the left midaxillary line, on a level with the umbilicus, presumably the place

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