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Article
August 8, 1914

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF COLON STASIS

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(6):441-444. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570060001001
Abstract

The subject of colonic toxemia may be studied under four headings: (a) colitis; (b) adhesions, membranes and kinks; (c) colon dilatations and visceroptosis, and (d) stasis. The solution of many vexed questions of alimentary toxemia may with good reason be sought in an understanding of the mutual relationship of these factors.

In examining the region of the terminal ileum, cecum and ascending colon of a large number of dogs, it is observed that this area is almost invariably the site of peri-intestinal inflammation with a notable tendency to the formation of membraniform adhesions. Such membraniform adhesions are very common in apparently healthy dogs. The vermiform appendix in the dog, as is well known, is very large, being virtually an elongation of the cecum. This abnormally large appendix is usually found to be tightly filled; likewise the ascending and transverse colons are more or less engorged at nearly all times in

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