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January 28, 1888


JAMA. 1888;X(4):125-127. doi:10.1001/jama.1888.02400300029008

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The University—Medical Colleges—Medical Societies—State Medical Laws—The Children's Hospital—Typhoid Fever.

A persistent and determined effort has been made by the Board of Trustees to incorporate the various institutions of learning under the banner of the Cincinnati University. This effort met with a great amount of strong opposition at first, so that for a time it seemed as though the enterprise would have to be abandoned; but at present the prospects of ultimate success are very bright. The University is largely supported by the income derived from a bequest made in the will of the late Charles McMicken; a tax of one tenth of a mill is also levied upon the taxable property of Cincinnati for its support. The bequest of Charles McMicken amounted to upwards of seven hundred thousand dollars; this amount is almost entirely invested in real estate in and around Cincinnati. In making their propositions to

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