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Article
August 8, 1914

What Men Live By: Work, Play, Love, Worship.

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(6):504. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570060064036

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Abstract

These essays on practical ethics lead to a definite end, but each is sufficient in itself. References to the life of the physician crop out, but not more so than references to other topics. Each point is made through living examples, and no walk of life has been neglected. Therefore the book is adapted to being picked up at odd moments and read at random. If the author did not intend this, he should not have made the book so interesting. It is an instance of what he himself has noted: "'Any one who works hard,' says Ostwald,... 'will find something new.' But this 'something' is usually found, accidentally as we say, while we are looking for something else. It is in this sense that genius results from taking infinite pains. It produces something never looked for, yet something which without the infinite pains could never have come to light."

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